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Open Access Review Article Issue
The 2020 Yearbook of Neurorestoratology
Journal of Neurorestoratology 2021, 9 (1): 1-12
Published: 08 June 2021
Downloads:11

COVID-19 has been an emerging and rapidly evolving risk to people of the world in 2020. Facing this dangerous situation, many colleagues in Neurorestoratology did their best to avoid infection if themselves and their patients, and continued their work in the research areas described in the 2020 Yearbook of Neurorestoratology. Neurorestorative achievements and progress during 2020 includes recent findings on the pathogenesis of neurological diseases, neurorestorative mechanisms and clinical therapeutic achievements. Therapeutic progress during this year included advances in cell therapies, neurostimulation/neuromodulation, brain-computer interface (BCI), and pharmaceutical neurorestorative therapies, which improved neurological functions and quality of life for patients. Four clinical guidelines or standards of Neurorestoratology were published in 2020. Milestone examples include: 1) a multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of olfactory ensheathing cell treatment of chronic stroke showed functional improvements; 2) patients after transhumeral amputation experienced increased sensory acuity and had improved effectiveness in work and other activities of daily life using a prosthesis; 3) a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis used a steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based BCI to achieve accurate and speedy computer input; 4) a patient with complete chronic spinal cord injury recovered both motor function and touch sensation with a BCI and restored ability to detect objects by touch and several sensorimotor functions. We hope these achievements motivate and encourage other scientists and physicians to increase neurorestorative research and its therapeutic applications.

Open Access Review Article Issue
Clinical neurorestorative cell therapies: Developmental process, current state and future prospective
Journal of Neurorestoratology 2020, 8 (2): 61-82
Published: 04 August 2020
Downloads:18

Clinical cell therapies (CTs) for neurological diseases and cellular damage have been explored for more than 2 decades. According to the United States Food and Drug Administration, there are 2 types of cell categories for therapy, namely stem cell-derived CT products and mature/functionally differentiated cell-derived CT products. However, regardless of the type of CT used, the majority of reports of clinical CTs from either small sample sizes based on single-center phase 1 or 2 unblinded trials or retrospective clinical studies showed effects on neurological improvement and the ability to either partially or temporarily thwart the deteriorating cellular processes of the neurodegenerative diseases. There have been only a few prospective, multicenter, randomized, double- blind placebo-control clinical trials of CTs so far in this developing novel area that have shown negative results, and more clinical trials are needed. This will expand our knowledge in exploring the type of cells that yield promising results and restore damaged neurological structure and functions of the central nervous system based on higher level evidence-based medical data. In this review, we briefly introduce the developmental process, current state, and future prospective for clinical neurorestorative CT.

Open Access Review Article Issue
The 2019 yearbook of Neurorestoratology
Journal of Neurorestoratology 2020, 8 (1): 1-11
Published: 23 April 2020
Downloads:20

Time is infinite movement in constant motion. We are glad to see that Neurorestoratology, a new discipline, has grown into a rich field involving many global researchers in recent years. In this 2019 yearbook of Neurorestoratology, we introduce the most recent advances and achievements in this field, including findings on the pathogenesis of neurological diseases, neurorestorative mechanisms, and clinical therapeutic achievements globally. Many patients have benefited from treatments involving cell therapies, neurostimulation/neuromodulation, brain–computer interface, neurorestorative surgery or pharmacy, and many others. Clinical physicians can refer to this yearbook with the latest knowledge and apply it to clinical practice.

Open Access Review Article Issue
2018 Yearbook of Neurorestoratology
Journal of Neurorestoratology 2019, 7 (1): 8-17
Published: 22 March 2019
Downloads:7

The Neurorestoratology discipline is getting worldwide attention from the clinicians, basic scientists, students and policy makers alike. Accordingly, this year too, the discipline has made profound advances and great achievements for the benefit of the mankind. In this report, of the 2018 Neurorestoratology Yearbook, salient features of new developments are summarized. This Yearbook consists 3 key themes namely (i) the new findings on pathogenesis of neurological diseases or degeneration; (ii) the new mechanisms of neurorestorative aspects; and (iii) the achievements and progresses made in the clinical field of neurorestorative therapies. The new trend has emerged in clinical studies that are based on greater levels of evidence-based medical practices both in clinical therapies and clinical trials based on standard designs.

Open Access Editorial Issue
Commemorating Geoffrey Raisman: a great neuroscientist and one of the founders of neurorestoratology and the IANR
Journal of Neurorestoratology 2018, 6 (1): 29-39
Published: 26 June 2018
Downloads:7
Open Access Expert Opinion Issue
Standards for the culture and quality control of umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells for neurorestorative clinical application (2017)
Journal of Neurorestoratology 2018, 6 (1): 11-15
Published: 26 June 2018
Downloads:5

Formulating common standards for the culture and quality control of umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is crucial for the standardization of clinical neurorestorative therapy. But to date, there have been no standardized guidelines for the culture and quality control of MSCs in neurorestorative clinical application. Based on a relatively comprehensive review of published clinical studies as well as the existing methods of MSC culture and quality control, the Chinese Association of Neurorestoratology has developed standards for the culture and quality control of umbilical cord MSCs which possess the potential in neurorestorative clinical application. These guidelines include standardized training and management procedures for laboratory operators; standardized use and management of materials and equipment; standardized collection, culture and proliferation of umbilical cord MSCs; standardized management for cell preservation, transport and related safeguard measures; as well as standardization of a clean environment, routine maintenance and related tests and examinations and so on. These guidelines represent the minimum required standards for the culture and quality control of umbilical cord MSCs for potential use in current neurorestorative clinical therapy, and will be further optimized according to the progress of preclinical and clinical studies.

Open Access Case Report Issue
Olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation for a patient with chronic sciatic nerve injury
Journal of Neurorestoratology 2017, 5 (1): 1-4
Published: 28 December 2017
Downloads:0
Objective:

To observe the result of olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation in a patient with chronic sciatic nerve injury.

Case report:

A 53-year-old male patient with chronic (1 year) sciatic nerve injury on left side received OEC transplantation at the lesion site. He received follow-up assessment according to the American Spinal Injury Association standard at 10 days, 6 months, and 1 year after OEC therapy. The muscle strength of his left lower limb increased and numbness decreased during the early stage of cell therapy. His motor function improved with each evaluation. His limp walking gait recovered, and numbness sensation got nearly normal after 1 year of follow-up. There were no side effects.

Conclusion:

OEC transplantation may be an option for chronic peripheral (sciatic) nerve injury.

Open Access Expert Opinion Issue
Neurorestorative clinical application standards for the culture and quality control of olfactory ensheathing cells
Journal of Neurorestoratology 2017, 5 (1): 175-179
Published: 22 September 2017
Downloads:0

Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a novel type of glial cell that can perform and promote many neurorestorative processes in vivo after transplant. To date, dozens of preclinical and clinical studies have confirmed that OECs have unique restoring effects in animal models and human subjects with neurological degeneration or damage, such as spinal cord injury, stroke, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, and motor neuron disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). To ensure the safety and effectiveness of clinical applications utilizing this type of cell, it is important to standardize cell-culture and quality-control processes. Based on a comprehensive review of published clinical studies, as well as existing methods of OEC culture and quality control currently utilized by hospitals and biomedical enterprises, the Chinese Association of Neurorestoratology has developed a set of standards for the culture and quality control of olfactory ensheathing cells for use in clinical applications. These guidelines include standardized training and management procedures for laboratory operators; standardized use and management of materials and equipment; standardized collection, culture, and proliferation of OECs obtained from fetal olfactory bulbs; standardized management for cell preservation, transport, and related safeguard measures; and the standardization of a clean environment, routine maintenance, and related tests and examinations. Our goal in publishing this set of standards is to promote the worldwide safety, effectiveness, and replicability of utilizing OECs obtained from fetal olfactory bulbs for neurorestorative clinical application.

Open Access Review Issue
2016 yearbook of neurorestoratology
Journal of Neurorestoratology 2017, 5 (1): 111-115
Published: 15 June 2017
Downloads:1

Neurorestoratology, a new interdisciplinary field, has gradually become a popular clinical discipline. Physicians and scientists in the neurorestoration field have discovered new pathogeneses of nervous system diseases and damage, explored new neurorestorative mechanisms, and obtained improving neurorestorative effects in clinical trials (or therapies). This paper summarizes the major progress achieved over the past year.

Open Access Expert Opinion Issue
Clinical therapeutic guideline for neurorestoration in spinal cord injury (Chinese version 2016)
Journal of Neurorestoratology 2017, 5 (1): 73-83
Published: 03 April 2017
Downloads:0

Restoring functions following spinal cord injury (SCI) was the most challenging task in clinical practice in the past. Fortunately, some effective neurorestorative methods have been exploited in acute, subacute, and chronic phase of SCI. There were no clinical neurorestorative therapeutic guidelines available before this document which can be followed by physicians to manage patients with acute, subacute, and chronic SCI. This guideline will be a helpful reference to physicians to implement their neurorestorative strategies that can help to improve the neurological functions in patients with SCI and their quality of life.

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