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Spinal cord injury (SCI) is catastrophic damage for patients, their family, and society. Researchers and clinicians have been trying to find neurorestorative methods to recover their injured functions and structures. Cell therapy is one of the effective therapeutic strategies for SCI. And it can partially restore their neurological functions, which are once thought as permanent neurological deficits. Currently, cells being used therapeutically in clinic include olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), mononuclear cells (MNCs), mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), Schwann cells, and hematopoietic stem cells, cell products differentiated from embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and neural stem cells as well as other kinds of cells. Real world data from these cell therapies showed some benefits in some patients with SCI. Due to being affected by many factors, the therapeutic results of some kinds of cells are contradictory and it is hard to compare effects among different types of cells. According to the data of cell therapies, OEC, MNC and MSC transplantation are applied for patients in majority percentage of cases, and OEC transplantation had a higher percentage of benefits. In next step, under the unified standard of cell preparation and quality control as well as the guidelines of clinical cell application, each kind of cells including OECs should be studied using prospective, multicenter, double-blind or observing-blind, placebo-control, randomized studies for SCI patients with different level of injury and chronicity.


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Advances and prospects of cell therapy for spinal cord injury patients

Show Author's information Hongyun Huang1( )Lin Chen2Gustavo Moviglia3Alok Sharma4Ziad M. Al Zoubi5Xijing He6,7Di Chen1
Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, Beijing 100143, China
Department of Neurosurgery, Dongzhimen Hospital, Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100700, China
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine of Wake Forest University, North Carolina, USA
Department of Neurosurgery, LTM Medical College, LTMG Hospital, Mumbai, Mumbai, India
Jordan Ortho and Spinal Centre, Al-Saif Medical Center, Amman, Jordan
Xi’an International Rehabilitation Medical Center, Xitai Road, Hi-Teck Industries Development Zone, Xi’an 710065, Shaanxi, China
Department of Orthopaedics, Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710004, Shaanxi, China

Abstract

Spinal cord injury (SCI) is catastrophic damage for patients, their family, and society. Researchers and clinicians have been trying to find neurorestorative methods to recover their injured functions and structures. Cell therapy is one of the effective therapeutic strategies for SCI. And it can partially restore their neurological functions, which are once thought as permanent neurological deficits. Currently, cells being used therapeutically in clinic include olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), mononuclear cells (MNCs), mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), Schwann cells, and hematopoietic stem cells, cell products differentiated from embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and neural stem cells as well as other kinds of cells. Real world data from these cell therapies showed some benefits in some patients with SCI. Due to being affected by many factors, the therapeutic results of some kinds of cells are contradictory and it is hard to compare effects among different types of cells. According to the data of cell therapies, OEC, MNC and MSC transplantation are applied for patients in majority percentage of cases, and OEC transplantation had a higher percentage of benefits. In next step, under the unified standard of cell preparation and quality control as well as the guidelines of clinical cell application, each kind of cells including OECs should be studied using prospective, multicenter, double-blind or observing-blind, placebo-control, randomized studies for SCI patients with different level of injury and chronicity.

Keywords:

spinal cord injury, cell therapy, neurorestoration, clinical trials
Received: 15 January 2022 Revised: 14 February 2022 Accepted: 02 March 2022 Published: 05 March 2022 Issue date: March 2022
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Received: 15 January 2022
Revised: 14 February 2022
Accepted: 02 March 2022
Published: 05 March 2022
Issue date: March 2022

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© The authors 2022.

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The authors thank Mr. Daqian Huang for his language polishing.

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