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Glioma is the most common primary malignant tumor of the adult central nervous system. It has high morbidity and poor survival. Myelin protein zero-like protein 1 (MPZL1) is a cell surface glycoprotein that activates numerous adhesion-dependent signaling pathways. MPZL1 plays important roles in human cancers that include metastatic process; however, it is not clear if MPZL1 plays a role in human glioma. Therefore, this study aimed to determine if silencing MPZL1 impacted the cell proliferative features of human glioma cells. First, MPZL1 expression was investigated in human glioma samples and tumor cell lines. Then the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeting MPZL1 were analyzed on proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle progression, and invasion of human glioma cells. The results from this study demonstrated that MPZL1 was highly expressed in human glioma tissues and glioma cell lines. In addition, knockdown of MPZL1 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, and invasiveness of glioma cells, and effectively induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Western blotting analysis indicated that silencing MPZL1 expression downregulated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), WNT1, caspase-3, cyclin A1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and upregulated p53. The results from this study suggest that MPZL1 might be a marker for tumors and could be a potential therapeutic target for human glioma.


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Silencing myelin protein zero-like 1 expression suppresses cell proliferation and invasiveness of human glioma cells by inhibiting multiple cancer-associated signal pathways

Show Author's information Simiao Zhang1,§Sandian Zhang2,§Hongzhen Wang3,§Xuege Huang4Jinzhi Wang4Jingna Li1Dan Cheng1Hongwei Wang5Daru Lu6,7( )Yunliang Wang1,8( )
Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450014, Henan, China
Department of Radiation Oncology, Li Huili Hospital of Ningbo Medical Center, Ningbo 315040, Zhejiang, China
Department of Orthopaedics, the First People's Hospital of Kunshan City, Kunshan 215300, Jiangsu, China
Department of Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu, China
Shanghai Realgen Biotech Inc., Pudong New District, Shanghai 203215, China
State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering and MOE Engineering Research Center of Gene Technology, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China
NHC Key Laboratory of Birth Defects and Reproductive Health, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Birth Defects and Reproductive Health, Chongqing Population and Family Planning, Science and Technology Research Institute, Chongqing 400020, China
Department of Neurology, The 960 Central Hospital of PLA, Zibo 255300, Shangdong, China

§ These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

Glioma is the most common primary malignant tumor of the adult central nervous system. It has high morbidity and poor survival. Myelin protein zero-like protein 1 (MPZL1) is a cell surface glycoprotein that activates numerous adhesion-dependent signaling pathways. MPZL1 plays important roles in human cancers that include metastatic process; however, it is not clear if MPZL1 plays a role in human glioma. Therefore, this study aimed to determine if silencing MPZL1 impacted the cell proliferative features of human glioma cells. First, MPZL1 expression was investigated in human glioma samples and tumor cell lines. Then the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeting MPZL1 were analyzed on proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle progression, and invasion of human glioma cells. The results from this study demonstrated that MPZL1 was highly expressed in human glioma tissues and glioma cell lines. In addition, knockdown of MPZL1 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, and invasiveness of glioma cells, and effectively induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Western blotting analysis indicated that silencing MPZL1 expression downregulated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), WNT1, caspase-3, cyclin A1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and upregulated p53. The results from this study suggest that MPZL1 might be a marker for tumors and could be a potential therapeutic target for human glioma.

Keywords:

glioma, brain tumor, MPZL1, RNA interference
Received: 27 June 2021 Revised: 29 July 2021 Accepted: 16 August 2021 Published: 04 January 2022 Issue date: December 2021
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Publication history

Received: 27 June 2021
Revised: 29 July 2021
Accepted: 16 August 2021
Published: 04 January 2022
Issue date: December 2021

Copyright

© The authors 2021

Acknowledgements

The authors thank Dr. Wenxiang Wei from Soochow University, Suzhou, China for his valuable advices and technical supports.

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This article is published with open access at http://jnr.tsinghuajournals.com

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