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The scales evaluating patients' neurological functions and quality of life are the basis of clinical evaluation and/or scientific research of nervous system diseases. Neurological functions of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) are commonly assessed by using American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale or International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI). Generally, the quality of life for SCI patients is evaluated by using several available evaluating scales. International Association of Neurorestoratology (IANR) Spinal Cord Injury Functional Rating Scale (IANR-SCIFRS) was designed as one single method to assess various items of quality of life related with SCI, including male sexual function. However, in clinical practice, the ability of returning to society is an important index of quality of life after SCI. Additionally, the female patients' sexual function after SCI that has been neglected in the past should be reconsidered following neurorestorative treatments. Even more, this scale also can be applied to assess the quality of life in patients with spinal cord dysfunction due to diseases or disorders. Thus, the IANR added the ability of returning to society and female patients' sexual function in the current revised version and renamed the scale as Spinal Cord Injury or Dysfunction Quality of Life Rating Scale (SCIDQLRS) (IANR 2022 version). Hopefully, this revised scale is widely used to expand enhanced improvements of quality of life following neurorestorative treatments in patients with SCI or spinal cord dysfunction.


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Spinal Cord Injury or Dysfunction Quality of Life Rating Scale (SCIDQLRS) (IANR 2022 version)

Show Author's information Hongyun Huanga( )Hari Shanker SharmabHooshang SabericLin ChendPaul R. SanbergeMengzhou XuefAlok SharmagDi ChenaDario SiniscalcohAlmudena Ramón-CuetoiHaitao XijLukui ChenkShiqing FenglXijing HemnTiansheng SunoJianjun LipXiaoling GuoqYaping FengrYixin ShensFangyong WangtZuncheng ZhenguXiaodong GuovJianzhong HuwZiad M. Al Zoubix( )
Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, Beijing 100143, China
Intensive Experimental CNS Injury and Repair, University Hospital, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
Department of Neurosurgery, Brain and Spinal Injury Research Center, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Department of Neurosurgery, Dongzhimen Hospital, Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100700, China
Center of Excellence for Aging & Brain Repair, Department of Neurosurgery & Brain Repair, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa 33612, Florida, USA
Department of Cerebrovascular Diseases, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450014, Henan, China
Department of Neurosurgery, LTM Medical College, LTMG Hospital, Mumbai, Mumbai, India
Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli" Via S. Maria di Costantinopoli 16 80138 Naples, Italy
Health Center Colmenar Norte, Plaza de Los Ríos 1, Colmenar Viejo 28770, Madrid, Spain
Department of Neurorehabilitation, Capital Medical University Affiliated Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital, Beijing 100144, China
Department of Neurosurgery, Neuroscience Center, Integrated Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510000, Guangdong, China
Orthopedic Department of General Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300052, China
Xi'an International Rehabilitation Medical Center, Hi-Teck Industries Development Zone, Xi'an 710065, Shaanxi, China
Department of Orthopaedics, Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710004, Shaanxi, China
Orthopedic Department of PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China
China Rehabilitation Science Institute, China Rehabilitation Research Center, Center of Neural Injury and Repair, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Beijing 100069, China
Neurological Department, 981 Hospital of Chinese PLA, Chengde 067000, Hebei, China
Department of Neurosurgery, The 920th Hospital of Joint Logistics Support Force of the Chinese PLA, Kunming 650032, China
Department of Orthopedics, Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004, Jiangsu, China
Rehabilitation School of Capital Medical University, Spine and Spinal Cord Surgery Department of China Rehabilitation Research Center, Beijing Boai Hospital, Beijing 100068, China
Department of Rehabilitation, Tai'an City Central Hospital, Tai'an 271000, Shandong, China
Department of Orthopedic, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Huben, China
Department of Spine Surgery, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha 410008, Hunan, China
Jordan Ortho and Spinal Centre, Al-Saif Medical Center, Amman, Jordan

Abstract

The scales evaluating patients' neurological functions and quality of life are the basis of clinical evaluation and/or scientific research of nervous system diseases. Neurological functions of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) are commonly assessed by using American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale or International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI). Generally, the quality of life for SCI patients is evaluated by using several available evaluating scales. International Association of Neurorestoratology (IANR) Spinal Cord Injury Functional Rating Scale (IANR-SCIFRS) was designed as one single method to assess various items of quality of life related with SCI, including male sexual function. However, in clinical practice, the ability of returning to society is an important index of quality of life after SCI. Additionally, the female patients' sexual function after SCI that has been neglected in the past should be reconsidered following neurorestorative treatments. Even more, this scale also can be applied to assess the quality of life in patients with spinal cord dysfunction due to diseases or disorders. Thus, the IANR added the ability of returning to society and female patients' sexual function in the current revised version and renamed the scale as Spinal Cord Injury or Dysfunction Quality of Life Rating Scale (SCIDQLRS) (IANR 2022 version). Hopefully, this revised scale is widely used to expand enhanced improvements of quality of life following neurorestorative treatments in patients with SCI or spinal cord dysfunction.

Keywords: Spinal cord injury, Neurorestorative treatments, SCIDQLRS, Spinal cord dysfunction, Assessment methods, Female sexual function, Ability of returning to society

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Received: 22 April 2022
Accepted: 08 August 2022
Published: 17 August 2022
Issue date: September 2022

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© 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Tsinghua University Press.

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This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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