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Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is a pathophysiological process involving small arteries such as cerebellar arteries, arterioles, capillaries, and veinlets. Imaging features vary; they are mainly composed of recent subcortical infarcts, lacunes of presumed vascular origin, white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) of presumed vascular origin, cerebral microbleeds, enlarged perivascular spaces, and global and regional brain atrophy. CSVD is a common cause of vascular cognitive dysfunction, and in its end stage, dementia often develops. CSVD has been a major research hotspot; however, its causes are poorly understood. Neuroimaging markers of CSVD can be used as the basis for etiological analysis. This review highlights the relevance of neuroimaging markers and cognitive impairment, providing a new direction for the early recognition, treatment, and prevention of cognitive dysfunction in small cerebral angiopathy.


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Cerebral small vessel disease and cognitive impairment

Show Author's information Lifang Meng1,2,3Jianhua Zhao1,2,3( )Junli Liu1,2,3Shaomin Li4
First Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang 453100, Henan, China
Henan Key Laboratory of Neurorestoratology, Xinxiang 453100, Henan,China
Henan Joint International Research Laboratory of Neurorestoratology for Senile Dementia, Xinxiang 453100, Henan, China
Center for Neurologic Diseases, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston 02115, Massachusetts, United States

Abstract

Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is a pathophysiological process involving small arteries such as cerebellar arteries, arterioles, capillaries, and veinlets. Imaging features vary; they are mainly composed of recent subcortical infarcts, lacunes of presumed vascular origin, white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) of presumed vascular origin, cerebral microbleeds, enlarged perivascular spaces, and global and regional brain atrophy. CSVD is a common cause of vascular cognitive dysfunction, and in its end stage, dementia often develops. CSVD has been a major research hotspot; however, its causes are poorly understood. Neuroimaging markers of CSVD can be used as the basis for etiological analysis. This review highlights the relevance of neuroimaging markers and cognitive impairment, providing a new direction for the early recognition, treatment, and prevention of cognitive dysfunction in small cerebral angiopathy.

Keywords: cerebral small vascular disease, cognitive impairment, neuroimaging markers

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Publication history
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Publication history

Received: 28 July 2019
Revised: 14 August 2019
Accepted: 06 December 2019
Published: 29 November 2019
Issue date: December 2019

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© The authors 2019

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by Henan Natural Science Foundation, China (No. 182300410389, grant to Jianhua Zhao); Scientific and Technological Project of Health and Family Planning Commission, Henan Province, China (No. 201303105 grant to Jianhua Zhao); Key Scientific Research Projects of Universities in Henan Province, China (No. 16B320019, grant to Jianhua Zhao); and the project of the Disciplinary Group of Psychology and Neuroscience, Xinxiang Medical University, China(No. 2016PN-KFKT-16, grant to Shaomin Li).

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