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Objective:

The objective of this study was to document the impact of the preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores on perioperative complications in patients with recurrent glioma who underwent tumor resection via craniotomy.

Methods:

A total of 96 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Based on KPS and ASA scores, patients were categorized into high KPS (> 70) or low KPS (≤ 70) and high ASA (3~4) or low ASA (1~2) groups. Differences in intraoperative risk factors and perioperative complications among the groups were analyzed. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors for perioperative complications.

Results:

The most frequent perioperative complications were cerebrospinal fluid leakage (31.8%) and intracranial infection (27.0%); 30-day mortality was 5.2%. The incidence rates of severe complications, central nervous system complications, and total complications were comparable in the low and high KPS groups and in the low and high ASA groups (all p > 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that low KPS and high ASA scores were not the independent risk factors for perioperative complications.

Conclusion:

Low KPS and high ASA scores are not associated with increased postoperative complications in patients with recurrent glioma who undergo tumor resection via craniotomy.


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Impact of preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores on perioperative complications in patients with recurrent glioma undergoing repeated operation

Show Author's information Zhong Deng1,2Hai Yu1,2Ning Wang1Wahap Alafate1,2Jia Wang1Tuo Wang1Changwang Du1( )Maode Wang1( )
Department of Neurosurgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710061, Shaanxi, China
School of Medicine, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710061, Shaanxi, China

Abstract

Objective:

The objective of this study was to document the impact of the preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores on perioperative complications in patients with recurrent glioma who underwent tumor resection via craniotomy.

Methods:

A total of 96 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Based on KPS and ASA scores, patients were categorized into high KPS (> 70) or low KPS (≤ 70) and high ASA (3~4) or low ASA (1~2) groups. Differences in intraoperative risk factors and perioperative complications among the groups were analyzed. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors for perioperative complications.

Results:

The most frequent perioperative complications were cerebrospinal fluid leakage (31.8%) and intracranial infection (27.0%); 30-day mortality was 5.2%. The incidence rates of severe complications, central nervous system complications, and total complications were comparable in the low and high KPS groups and in the low and high ASA groups (all p > 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that low KPS and high ASA scores were not the independent risk factors for perioperative complications.

Conclusion:

Low KPS and high ASA scores are not associated with increased postoperative complications in patients with recurrent glioma who undergo tumor resection via craniotomy.

Keywords:

complications, repeated craniotomy, glioma, Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score
Received: 17 July 2019 Revised: 22 August 2019 Accepted: 17 September 2019 Published: 18 September 2019 Issue date: September 2019
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Publication history
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Publication history

Received: 17 July 2019
Revised: 22 August 2019
Accepted: 17 September 2019
Published: 18 September 2019
Issue date: September 2019

Copyright

© The authors 2019

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant no. 81802502) and the Clinical Research Award of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, China (No. XJTU1AF-2016-018).

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This article is published with open access at http://jnr.tsinghuajournals.com

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