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Research Article | Open Access

Attempted preparation of La0.5Ba0.5MnO3−δ leading to an in-situ formation of manganate nanocomposites as a cathode for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells

Rui Zhoua,Yanru Yina,Hailu DaibXuan YangaYueyuan Gua( )Lei Bia( )
School of Resources Environment and Safety Engineering, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, China
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Yancheng 224051, China

† Rui Zhou and Yanru Yin contributed equally to this work.

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Abstract

A La0.5Ba0.5MnO3−δ oxide was prepared using the sol–gel technique. Instead of a pure phase, La0.5Ba0.5MnO3−δ was discovered to be a combination of La0.7Ba0.3MnO3−δ and BaMnO3. The in-situ production of La0.7Ba0.3MnO3−δ+BaMnO3 nanocomposites enhanced the oxygen vacancy (VO) formation compared to single-phase La0.7Ba0.3MnO3−δ or BaMnO3, providing potential benefits as a cathode for fuel cells. Subsequently, La0.7Ba0.3MnO3−δ+BaMnO3 nanocomposites were utilized as the cathode for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (H-SOFCs), which significantly improved cell performance. At 700 ℃, H-SOFC with a La0.7Ba0.3MnO3−δ+BaMnO3 nanocomposite cathode achieved the highest power density (1504 mW·cm−2) yet recorded for H-SOFCs with manganate cathodes. This performance was much greater than that of single-phase La0.7Ba0.3MnO3−δ or BaMnO3 cathode cells. In addition, the cell demonstrated excellent working stability. First-principles calculations indicated that the La0.7Ba0.3MnO3−δ/BaMnO3 interface was crucial for the enhanced cathode performance. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) free energy barrier was significantly lower at the La0.7Ba0.3MnO3−δ/BaMnO3 interface than that at the La0.7Ba0.3MnO3−δ or BaMnO3 surfaces, which explained the origin of high performance and gave a guide for the construction of novel cathodes for H-SOFCs.

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Journal of Advanced Ceramics
Pages 1189-1200
Cite this article:
Zhou R, Yin Y, Dai H, et al. Attempted preparation of La0.5Ba0.5MnO3−δ leading to an in-situ formation of manganate nanocomposites as a cathode for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells. Journal of Advanced Ceramics, 2023, 12(6): 1189-1200. https://doi.org/10.26599/JAC.2023.9220748

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Received: 28 January 2023
Revised: 08 March 2023
Accepted: 26 March 2023
Published: 19 May 2023
© The Author(s) 2023.

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