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The influence of different wood species (in the form of wood chips) on the formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) in smoked Harbin red sausages was investigated. Four common species of wood (pear, oak, apple, beech) were used for smoking. The smoking process significantly affected the moisture content, water activity, pH, lipid oxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances), protein oxidation (carbonyl content) and HAA content. It was found that the wood species significantly influenced the contents of HAAs in the smoked samples. Total HAA contents were highest in samples smoked using wood chips produced from pear, followed by oak, beech and apple. The contents of Norharman and Harman were much higher than those of the other HAAs. Lipid oxidation and protein oxidation were significantly associated with the formation of total HAAs in samples. It is shown that the type of wood chips used for smoking is one of the critical parameters affecting the contamination of HAAs in smoked meat products.


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Effect of different wood species on heterocyclic aromatic amine level in Harbin red sausages

Show Author's information Xiaoyu Yin1,§Wenjun Yang1,§Qian Liu2Baohua Kong2Qian Chen2( )
College of Food Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500, China
College of Food Science, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030, China

§These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

The influence of different wood species (in the form of wood chips) on the formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) in smoked Harbin red sausages was investigated. Four common species of wood (pear, oak, apple, beech) were used for smoking. The smoking process significantly affected the moisture content, water activity, pH, lipid oxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances), protein oxidation (carbonyl content) and HAA content. It was found that the wood species significantly influenced the contents of HAAs in the smoked samples. Total HAA contents were highest in samples smoked using wood chips produced from pear, followed by oak, beech and apple. The contents of Norharman and Harman were much higher than those of the other HAAs. Lipid oxidation and protein oxidation were significantly associated with the formation of total HAAs in samples. It is shown that the type of wood chips used for smoking is one of the critical parameters affecting the contamination of HAAs in smoked meat products.

Keywords: protein oxidation, lipid oxidation, heterocyclic aromatic amine, wood chip, harbin red sausage

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Publication history

Received: 01 July 2023
Revised: 19 July 2023
Accepted: 18 September 2023
Published: 20 November 2023
Issue date: October 2023

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© Beijing Academy of Food Sciences 2023.

Acknowledgements

Acknowledgements

This study was funded by the Xingdian Talent Support Plan for young talents of Yunnan Province (CG23166F350A), College Students’ Innovation and Entrepreneurship Training Program of Yunnan Province (S202210674090) and the Major Science and Technology Projects of Heilongjiang Province (2020ZX07B02) and College Students’ Innovation and Entrepreneurship Training Program of Yunnan Province (S202210674090).

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Food Science of Animal Products published by Tsinghua University Press. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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