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The real-time, noninvasive, nonionizing, high spatiotemporal resolution, and flexibility characteristics of molecular fluorescence imaging provide a uniquely powerful approach to imaging and monitoring the physiology and pathophysiology of ischemic stroke. Currently, various fluorescence probes have been synthesized with the aim of improving quantitative and quantitative studies of the pathologic processes of ischemic stroke in living animals. In this review, we present an overview of current activatable fluorescence probes for the imaging and diagnosis of ischemic stroke in animal models. We categorize the probes based on their activatable signals from the biomarkers associated with ischemic stroke, and we present representative examples of their functional mechanisms. Finally, we briefly discuss future perspectives in this field.


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Activatable molecular fluorescence probes for the imaging and detection of ischemic stroke

Show Author's information Mengdie Wang1( )Yan Zhang2( )
Department of Neurology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei, China
National Engineering Research Centre for Nanomedicine, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, Hubei, China

Abstract

The real-time, noninvasive, nonionizing, high spatiotemporal resolution, and flexibility characteristics of molecular fluorescence imaging provide a uniquely powerful approach to imaging and monitoring the physiology and pathophysiology of ischemic stroke. Currently, various fluorescence probes have been synthesized with the aim of improving quantitative and quantitative studies of the pathologic processes of ischemic stroke in living animals. In this review, we present an overview of current activatable fluorescence probes for the imaging and diagnosis of ischemic stroke in animal models. We categorize the probes based on their activatable signals from the biomarkers associated with ischemic stroke, and we present representative examples of their functional mechanisms. Finally, we briefly discuss future perspectives in this field.

Keywords: ischemic stroke, detection, molecular imaging, metal ion, protease, ROS, fluorescence probe

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Publication history

Received: 21 October 2022
Revised: 08 November 2022
Accepted: 08 November 2022
Published: 27 February 2023
Issue date: March 2023

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© The authors 2023.

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