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The present work describes the use of noninvasive diffuse optical tomography (DOT) technology to measure hemodynamic changes, providing relevant information which helps to understand the basis of neurophysiology in the human brain. Advantages such as portability, direct measurements of hemoglobin state, temporal resolution, non-restricted movements as occurs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices mean that DOT technology can be used in research and clinical fields. In this review we covered the neurophysiology, physical principles underlying optical imaging during tissue-light interactions, and technology commonly used during the construction of a DOT device including the source-detector requirements to improve the image quality. DOT provides 3D cerebral activation images due to complex mathematical models which describe the light propagation inside the tissue head. Moreover, we describe briefly the use of Bayesian methods for raw DOT data filtering as an alternative to linear filters widely used in signal processing, avoiding common problems such as the filter selection or a false interpretation of the results which is sometimes due to the interference of background physiological noise with neural activity.


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Diffuse optical tomography in the human brain: A briefly review from the neurophysiology to its applications

Show Author's information Estefania Hernandez-Martin( )José Luis Gonzalez-Mora
Department of Basic Medical Science, Faculty of Health Science, Medicine Section, Universidad de La Laguna, 38071, Spain

Abstract

The present work describes the use of noninvasive diffuse optical tomography (DOT) technology to measure hemodynamic changes, providing relevant information which helps to understand the basis of neurophysiology in the human brain. Advantages such as portability, direct measurements of hemoglobin state, temporal resolution, non-restricted movements as occurs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices mean that DOT technology can be used in research and clinical fields. In this review we covered the neurophysiology, physical principles underlying optical imaging during tissue-light interactions, and technology commonly used during the construction of a DOT device including the source-detector requirements to improve the image quality. DOT provides 3D cerebral activation images due to complex mathematical models which describe the light propagation inside the tissue head. Moreover, we describe briefly the use of Bayesian methods for raw DOT data filtering as an alternative to linear filters widely used in signal processing, avoiding common problems such as the filter selection or a false interpretation of the results which is sometimes due to the interference of background physiological noise with neural activity.

Keywords:

diffuse optical imaging image reconstruction algorithms, filtering DOT data, biomedical applications
Received: 12 April 2020 Revised: 06 May 2020 Accepted: 25 May 2020 Published: 28 December 2020 Issue date: December 2020
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Received: 12 April 2020
Revised: 06 May 2020
Accepted: 25 May 2020
Published: 28 December 2020
Issue date: December 2020

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