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The speed of spread of Coronavirus Disease 2019 led to global lockdowns and disruptions in the academic sector. The study examined the impact of mobile technology on physics education during lockdowns. Data were collected through an online survey and later evaluated using regression tools, frequency, and an analysis of variance (ANOVA). The findings revealed that the usage of mobile technology had statistically significant effects on physics instructors’ and students’ academics during the coronavirus lockdown. Most of the participants admitted that the use of mobile technologies such as smartphones, laptops, PDAs, Zoom, mobile apps, etc. were very useful and helpful for continued education amid the pandemic restrictions. Online teaching is very effective during lock-down with smartphones and laptops on different platforms. The paper brings the limelight to the growing power of mobile technology solutions in physics education.


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Impact of Mobile Technology and Use of Big Data in Physics Education During Coronavirus Lockdown

Show Author's information Edeh Michael Onyema1Rijwan Khan2( )Nwafor Chika Eucheria3Tribhuwan Kumar4
Department of Vocational and Technical Education, Faculty of Education, Alex Ekwueme Federal University, Ndufu-Alike, Abakaliki, P.M.B. 1010, Nigeria, and also with the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Coal City University, Enugu 2022/2023, Nigeria.
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, ABES Institute of Technology (affiliated to AKTU), Ghaziabad 20109, India.
Department of Science Education, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki 480103, Nigeria.
Department of English Language and Literature, College of Science and Humanities in Slayel, Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Kharj 16436, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

The speed of spread of Coronavirus Disease 2019 led to global lockdowns and disruptions in the academic sector. The study examined the impact of mobile technology on physics education during lockdowns. Data were collected through an online survey and later evaluated using regression tools, frequency, and an analysis of variance (ANOVA). The findings revealed that the usage of mobile technology had statistically significant effects on physics instructors’ and students’ academics during the coronavirus lockdown. Most of the participants admitted that the use of mobile technologies such as smartphones, laptops, PDAs, Zoom, mobile apps, etc. were very useful and helpful for continued education amid the pandemic restrictions. Online teaching is very effective during lock-down with smartphones and laptops on different platforms. The paper brings the limelight to the growing power of mobile technology solutions in physics education.

Keywords: coronavirus, smartphone, mobile technology, physics education, remote learning

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Received: 14 April 2022
Revised: 21 May 2022
Accepted: 02 June 2022
Published: 07 April 2023
Issue date: September 2023

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© The author(s) 2023.

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