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In recent time, data analysis using machine learning accelerates optimized solutions on clinical healthcare systems. The machine learning methods greatly offer an efficient prediction ability in diagnosis system alternative with the clinicians. Most of the systems operate on the extracted features from the patients and most of the predicted cases are accurate. However, in recent time, the prevalence of COVID-19 has emerged the global healthcare industry to find a new drug that suppresses the pandemic outbreak. In this paper, we design a Deep Neural Network (DNN) model that accurately finds the protein-ligand interactions with the drug used. The DNN senses the response of protein-ligand interactions for a specific drug and identifies which drug makes the interaction that combats effectively the virus. With limited genome sequence of Indian patients submitted to the GISAID database, we find that the DNN system is effective in identifying the protein-ligand interactions for a specific drug.


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Analysis of Protein-Ligand Interactions of SARS-CoV-2 Against Selective Drug Using Deep Neural Networks

Show Author's information Natarajan YuvarajKannan Srihari( )Selvaraj ChandragandhiRajan Arshath RajaGaurav DhimanAmandeep Kaur
St. Peter’s Institute of Higher Education and Research, Chennai 600054, India
Information Communication Technology Academy, Chennai 600096, India
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, SNS College of Engineering, Coimbatore 641107, India
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Jagannath Educational Health and Charitable Trust College of Engineering and Technology, Coimbatore 641105, India
B. S. Abdur Rahman Crescent Institute of Science and Technology, Chennai 600048, India
Department of Computer Science, Government Bikram College of Commerce, Patiala 147001, India
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Sri Guru Granth Sahib World University, Fatehgarh 140406, India

Abstract

In recent time, data analysis using machine learning accelerates optimized solutions on clinical healthcare systems. The machine learning methods greatly offer an efficient prediction ability in diagnosis system alternative with the clinicians. Most of the systems operate on the extracted features from the patients and most of the predicted cases are accurate. However, in recent time, the prevalence of COVID-19 has emerged the global healthcare industry to find a new drug that suppresses the pandemic outbreak. In this paper, we design a Deep Neural Network (DNN) model that accurately finds the protein-ligand interactions with the drug used. The DNN senses the response of protein-ligand interactions for a specific drug and identifies which drug makes the interaction that combats effectively the virus. With limited genome sequence of Indian patients submitted to the GISAID database, we find that the DNN system is effective in identifying the protein-ligand interactions for a specific drug.

Keywords:

Deep Neural Network (DNN), coronavirus, protein-ligand interactions, deep learning, clinical healthcare system
Received: 04 June 2020 Accepted: 18 June 2020 Published: 12 January 2021 Issue date: June 2021
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Received: 04 June 2020
Accepted: 18 June 2020
Published: 12 January 2021
Issue date: June 2021

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