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The ability of dragonflies to fly in the rain without being wetted by raindrops has motivated researchers to investigate the impact behavior of a drop on the superhydrophobic wings of dragonflies. This superhydrophobic surface is used as a reference for the design of directional surfaces and has attracted extensive attention owing to its wide applicability in microfluidics, self-cleaning, and other fields. In this study, the static contact angle and rebound process of a drop impacting a dragonfly wing surface are investigated experimentally, whereas the wetting pressure, Gibbs free energy, and Stokes number vs. coefficient of restitution are theoretically calculated to examine the dynamic and unidirectional transport behaviors of the drop. Results show that the initial inclination angle of the dragonfly wing is similar to the sliding angles along with the drop sliding. The water drop bounces from the bottom of the dragonfly wing to the distal position, demonstrating directional migration. The drop impacts the dragonfly wing surface, and the drop exhibits compression, recovery, and separation phases; in these three phases, the drop morphology evolves. As the Gibbs free energy and cross-sectional area evolve, the coefficient of restitution decreases as the drop continues to bounce, and the Stokes number increases.


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Drop impact dynamic and directional transport on dragonfly wing surface

Show Author's information Jing XU1Wenjun LIU1Weixiao SHANG2Jun CHEN2( )Jiadi LIAN3
School of Mechanical Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018, China
School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA
College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018, China

Abstract

The ability of dragonflies to fly in the rain without being wetted by raindrops has motivated researchers to investigate the impact behavior of a drop on the superhydrophobic wings of dragonflies. This superhydrophobic surface is used as a reference for the design of directional surfaces and has attracted extensive attention owing to its wide applicability in microfluidics, self-cleaning, and other fields. In this study, the static contact angle and rebound process of a drop impacting a dragonfly wing surface are investigated experimentally, whereas the wetting pressure, Gibbs free energy, and Stokes number vs. coefficient of restitution are theoretically calculated to examine the dynamic and unidirectional transport behaviors of the drop. Results show that the initial inclination angle of the dragonfly wing is similar to the sliding angles along with the drop sliding. The water drop bounces from the bottom of the dragonfly wing to the distal position, demonstrating directional migration. The drop impacts the dragonfly wing surface, and the drop exhibits compression, recovery, and separation phases; in these three phases, the drop morphology evolves. As the Gibbs free energy and cross-sectional area evolve, the coefficient of restitution decreases as the drop continues to bounce, and the Stokes number increases.

Keywords:

dragonfly wing, superhydrophobic, wettability, directional transport, bounce
Received: 02 April 2022 Revised: 05 May 2022 Accepted: 17 May 2022 Published: 06 January 2023 Issue date: May 2023
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Publication history

Received: 02 April 2022
Revised: 05 May 2022
Accepted: 17 May 2022
Published: 06 January 2023
Issue date: May 2023

Copyright

© The author(s) 2022.

Acknowledgements

The research is financially supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 52275182) and Provincial Universities of Zhejiang, China (No. GK229909299001‐14).

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