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The MAX phase Ti3SiC2 has broad application prospects in the field of rail transit, nuclear protective materials and electrode materials due to its excellent electrical conductivity, self- lubricating properties and wear resistance. Cu–Ti3SiC2 co-continuous composites have superior performance due to the continuous distribution of 3D network structures. In this paper, the Cu/Ti3SiC2(TiC/SiC) co-continuous composites are formed via vacuum infiltration process from Cu and Ti3SiC2 porous ceramics. The co-continuous composites have significantly improved the flexural strength and conductivity of Ti3SiC2 due to the addition of Cu, with the conductivity up to 5.73×105 S/m, twice as high as the Ti3SiC2 porous ceramics and five times higher than graphite. The reaction between ingredients leads to an increase in the friction coefficient, while the hard reaction products (TiCx, SiC) lower the overall wear rate (1×10–3 mm3/(N·m)). Excellent electrical conductivity and wear resistance make co-continuous composites more advantageous in areas such as rail transit.


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Highly conductive wear resistant Cu/Ti3SiC2(TiC/SiC) co-continuous composites via vacuum infiltration process

Show Author's information Dexuan YANGaYu ZHOUbXingheng YANaHonglei WANGaXingui ZHOUa( )
Science and Technology on Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites Laboratory, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073, China
Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago 60616, USA

Abstract

The MAX phase Ti3SiC2 has broad application prospects in the field of rail transit, nuclear protective materials and electrode materials due to its excellent electrical conductivity, self- lubricating properties and wear resistance. Cu–Ti3SiC2 co-continuous composites have superior performance due to the continuous distribution of 3D network structures. In this paper, the Cu/Ti3SiC2(TiC/SiC) co-continuous composites are formed via vacuum infiltration process from Cu and Ti3SiC2 porous ceramics. The co-continuous composites have significantly improved the flexural strength and conductivity of Ti3SiC2 due to the addition of Cu, with the conductivity up to 5.73×105 S/m, twice as high as the Ti3SiC2 porous ceramics and five times higher than graphite. The reaction between ingredients leads to an increase in the friction coefficient, while the hard reaction products (TiCx, SiC) lower the overall wear rate (1×10–3 mm3/(N·m)). Excellent electrical conductivity and wear resistance make co-continuous composites more advantageous in areas such as rail transit.

Keywords:

Ti3SiC2, metal–ceramic co-continuous composites, vacuum infiltration, high conductive
Received: 23 July 2019 Revised: 06 October 2019 Accepted: 06 October 2019 Published: 05 February 2020 Issue date: February 2020
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Publication history
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Publication history

Received: 23 July 2019
Revised: 06 October 2019
Accepted: 06 October 2019
Published: 05 February 2020
Issue date: February 2020

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© The author(s) 2019

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