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Highly pure Al4SiC4 powders were prepared by carbothermic reduction at 2173 K using Al2O3, SiO2, and graphite as raw materials. The obtained Al4SiC4 powders owned hexagonal plate-like grains with a diameter of about 200-300 μm and a thickness of about 2-6 μm. Based on the experimental results, the reaction of Al4SiC4 formation and grain evolution mechanisms were determined from thermodynamic and first-principles calculations. The results indicated that the synthesis of Al4SiC4 by the carbothermic reduction consisted of two parts, i.e., solid-solid reactions initially followed by complex gas-solid and gas-gas reactions. The grain growth mechanism of Al4SiC4 featured a two-dimensional nucleation and growth mechanism. The gas phases formed during the sintering process favored the preferential grain growth of (0010) and (11¯0) planes resulting in formation of hexagonal plate-like Al4SiC4 grains.


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Synthesis of Al4SiC4 powders via carbothermic reduction: Reaction and grain growth mechanisms

Show Author's information Xinming XINGaJunhong CHENa( )Guoping BEIbBin LIcKuo-Chih CHOUcXinmei HOUc( )
School of Material Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 3ME, Delft University of Technology, Delft, 2628CD, the Netherlands
State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China

Abstract

Highly pure Al4SiC4 powders were prepared by carbothermic reduction at 2173 K using Al2O3, SiO2, and graphite as raw materials. The obtained Al4SiC4 powders owned hexagonal plate-like grains with a diameter of about 200-300 μm and a thickness of about 2-6 μm. Based on the experimental results, the reaction of Al4SiC4 formation and grain evolution mechanisms were determined from thermodynamic and first-principles calculations. The results indicated that the synthesis of Al4SiC4 by the carbothermic reduction consisted of two parts, i.e., solid-solid reactions initially followed by complex gas-solid and gas-gas reactions. The grain growth mechanism of Al4SiC4 featured a two-dimensional nucleation and growth mechanism. The gas phases formed during the sintering process favored the preferential grain growth of (0010) and (11¯0) planes resulting in formation of hexagonal plate-like Al4SiC4 grains.

Keywords:

Al4SiC4, carbothermic reduction, hexagonal plate-like, growth mechanism
Received: 08 July 2017 Revised: 22 August 2017 Accepted: 08 September 2017 Published: 19 December 2017 Issue date: December 2017
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Publication history

Received: 08 July 2017
Revised: 22 August 2017
Accepted: 08 September 2017
Published: 19 December 2017
Issue date: December 2017

Copyright

© The author(s) 2017

Acknowledgements

The authors express their appreciation to the National Science Fund for Excellent Young Scholars of China (No. 51522402). The authors also appreciate the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51572019 and U1460201) and the Central Universities of FRF-TP-15-006C1 for financial support.

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