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Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can support the building of flexible and porous scaffolds for bone regeneration. Various studies have looked at the mixing of CNTs with hydroxyapaptite for the formulation of bone implants. In the present work, we report the one step preparation and characterisation of chitosan/hydroxyapatite/CNTs composite materials obtained by wet precipitation of hydroxyapatite (HA) in the presence of chitosan or its amphiphilic derivative N-octyl-O-sulphate chitosan and CNTs. The in situ precipitation of HA assured inclusion of the polysaccharide and the CNTs in the HA structure and provided materials with the ability to control the release of different model drugs.


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Synthesis of carbon nanotubes loaded hydroxyapatite: Potential for controlled drug release from bone implants

Show Author's information Lisa COSTANTINIaNikolaos BOUROPOULOSb,cDimitrios G. FATOUROSdIoanna KONTOPOULOUbMarta ROLDOa( )
School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Science, University of Portsmouth, St Michael’s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth, UK
Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504 Rio, Patras, Greece
Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas–Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes—FORTH/ICEHT, P.O. Box 1414, GR 26504 Patras, Greece
Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, School of Pharmacy, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki, Greece

Abstract

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can support the building of flexible and porous scaffolds for bone regeneration. Various studies have looked at the mixing of CNTs with hydroxyapaptite for the formulation of bone implants. In the present work, we report the one step preparation and characterisation of chitosan/hydroxyapatite/CNTs composite materials obtained by wet precipitation of hydroxyapatite (HA) in the presence of chitosan or its amphiphilic derivative N-octyl-O-sulphate chitosan and CNTs. The in situ precipitation of HA assured inclusion of the polysaccharide and the CNTs in the HA structure and provided materials with the ability to control the release of different model drugs.

Keywords:

carbon nanotubes (CNTs), hydroxyapatite (HA) composites, bone regeneration, chitosan
Received: 02 March 2016 Revised: 10 June 2016 Accepted: 11 June 2016 Published: 21 August 2016 Issue date: September 2016
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Publication history

Received: 02 March 2016
Revised: 10 June 2016
Accepted: 11 June 2016
Published: 21 August 2016
Issue date: September 2016

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© The author(s) 2016

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