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Pure and noble metal (Pt, Pd, and Au) doped TiO2 nanoceramics have been prepared from TiO2 nanoparticles through traditional pressing and sintering. For those samples sintered at 550 ℃, a typical premature sintering occurred, which led to the formation of a highly porous microstructure with a Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) specific surface area of 23 m2/g. At room temperature, only Pt-doped samples showed obvious response to hydrogen, with sensitivities as high as ~500 for 1000 ppm H2 in N2; at 300 ℃, all samples showed obvious responses to CO, while the responses of noble metal doped samples were much higher than that of the undoped ones. The mechanism for the observed sensing capabilities has been discussed, in which the catalytic effect of Pt for hydrogen is believed responsible for the room-temperature hydrogen sensing capabilities, and the absence of glass frit as commonly used in commercial thick-film metal oxide gas sensors is related to the high sensitivities. It is proposed that much attention should be paid to metal oxide porous nanoceramics in developing gas sensors with high sensitivities and low working temperatures.


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Gas sensing capabilities of TiO2 porous nanoceramics prepared through premature sintering

Show Author's information Yao XIONGaZilong TANGbYu WANGcYongming HUdHaoshuang GUdYuanzhi LIeHelen Lai Wah CHANcWanping CHENa( )
Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China
School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
Department of Applied Physics and Materials Research Centre, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
Faculty of Physics and Electronic Technology, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062, China
State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070, China

Abstract

Pure and noble metal (Pt, Pd, and Au) doped TiO2 nanoceramics have been prepared from TiO2 nanoparticles through traditional pressing and sintering. For those samples sintered at 550 ℃, a typical premature sintering occurred, which led to the formation of a highly porous microstructure with a Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) specific surface area of 23 m2/g. At room temperature, only Pt-doped samples showed obvious response to hydrogen, with sensitivities as high as ~500 for 1000 ppm H2 in N2; at 300 ℃, all samples showed obvious responses to CO, while the responses of noble metal doped samples were much higher than that of the undoped ones. The mechanism for the observed sensing capabilities has been discussed, in which the catalytic effect of Pt for hydrogen is believed responsible for the room-temperature hydrogen sensing capabilities, and the absence of glass frit as commonly used in commercial thick-film metal oxide gas sensors is related to the high sensitivities. It is proposed that much attention should be paid to metal oxide porous nanoceramics in developing gas sensors with high sensitivities and low working temperatures.

Keywords:

TiO2, porous nanoceramics, premature sintering, sensors, hydrogen, CO
Received: 08 May 2015 Accepted: 10 May 2015 Published: 30 May 2015 Issue date: June 2015
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Publication history
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Publication history

Received: 08 May 2015
Accepted: 10 May 2015
Published: 30 May 2015
Issue date: June 2015

Copyright

© The author(s) 2015

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National High-tech R&D Program of China (863 Program) (No. 2013AA031903) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. J1210061 and 50772077.

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