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Strong shock wave interactions with ceramic material ceria (CeO2) in presence of O2 and N2 gases were investigated using free piston driven shock tube (FPST). FPST is used to heat the test gas to very high temperature of about 6800–7700 K (estimated) at pressure of about 6.8–7.2 MPa for short duration (2–4 ms) behind the reflected shock wave. Ceria is subjected to super heating and cooling at the rate of about 106 K/s. Characterization of CeO2 sample was done before and after exposure to shock heated test gases (O2 and N2). The surface composition, crystal structure, electronic structure and surface morphology of CeO2 ceramic were examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Results obtained from the experimental investigations show that CeO2 can withstand high pressure accompanied by thermal shock without changing its crystal structure. Reducible CeO2 releases lattice oxygen making it possible to shift between reduced and oxidized states upon the interaction with shock heated gas. Due to such reaction mechanism, CeO2 ceramic undergoes nitrogen doping with decrease in lattice parameter. Investigations reveal that CeO2 retains its crystal structure during strong shock interaction, even at elevated pressure.


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Investigation of strong shock wave interactions with CeO2 ceramic

Show Author's information Vishakantaiah JAYARAMa( )Asha GUPTAbK. P. J. REDDYc
Shock Induced Materials Chemistry Lab, SSCU, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012, India
Texas Materials Institute, the University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012, India

Abstract

Strong shock wave interactions with ceramic material ceria (CeO2) in presence of O2 and N2 gases were investigated using free piston driven shock tube (FPST). FPST is used to heat the test gas to very high temperature of about 6800–7700 K (estimated) at pressure of about 6.8–7.2 MPa for short duration (2–4 ms) behind the reflected shock wave. Ceria is subjected to super heating and cooling at the rate of about 106 K/s. Characterization of CeO2 sample was done before and after exposure to shock heated test gases (O2 and N2). The surface composition, crystal structure, electronic structure and surface morphology of CeO2 ceramic were examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Results obtained from the experimental investigations show that CeO2 can withstand high pressure accompanied by thermal shock without changing its crystal structure. Reducible CeO2 releases lattice oxygen making it possible to shift between reduced and oxidized states upon the interaction with shock heated gas. Due to such reaction mechanism, CeO2 ceramic undergoes nitrogen doping with decrease in lattice parameter. Investigations reveal that CeO2 retains its crystal structure during strong shock interaction, even at elevated pressure.

Keywords:

shock tube, shock interaction, high enthalpy gas, ceria, nitrogen-doped, surface reaction
Received: 05 April 2014 Revised: 16 July 2014 Accepted: 23 July 2014 Published: 30 November 2014 Issue date: December 2014
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Publication history

Received: 05 April 2014
Revised: 16 July 2014
Accepted: 23 July 2014
Published: 30 November 2014
Issue date: December 2014

Copyright

© The author(s) 2014

Acknowledgements

Financial supports for this study from the DST, DRDO and ISRO-IISc Space Technology Cell, Government of India, are gratefully acknowledged.

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