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There have been intensive and continuous research efforts in large-scale controlled assembly of one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials, since this is the most effective and promising route toward advanced functional systems including integrated nano-circuits and flexible electronic devices. To date, numerous assembly approaches have been reported, showing considerable progresses in developing a variety of 1D nanomaterial assemblies and integrated systems with outstanding performance. However, obstacles and challenges remain ahead. Here, in this review, we summarize most widely studied assembly approaches such as Langmuir-Blodgett technique, substrate release/stretching, substrate rubbing and blown bubble films, depending on three types of external forces: compressive, tensile and shear forces. We highlight the important roles of these mechanical forces in aligning 1D nanomaterials such as semiconducting nanowires and carbon nanotubes, and discuss each approach on their effectiveness in achieving high-degree alignment, distinct characteristics and major limitations. Finally, we point out possible research directions in this field including rational control on the orientation, density and registration, toward scale-up and cost-effective manufacturing, as well as novel assembled systems based on 1D heterojunctions and hybrid structures.

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Publication history

Received: 16 September 2019
Revised: 18 October 2019
Accepted: 03 November 2019
Published: 26 November 2019
Issue date: May 2020

Copyright

© Tsinghua University Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Acknowledgements

This work was financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51802063). Y. Y. S. thanks the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51872267), and A. Y. C. acknowledges the National Key R&D Program of China (No. 2016YFE0127300).

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Email: nanores@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn

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